medievalpoc
medievalpoc:

hugahalf-elf:

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T
Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library





A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).
Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.
After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).
The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).
-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)






Now we know what happened to the unicorns.
They were all EATEN.

WAIT ARE YOU TRYING TO TELL ME THEY’VE BEEN SELLING ME FAUXNICORN?????

medievalpoc:

hugahalf-elf:

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T

Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library

A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

image

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).

Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.

After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

image

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).

The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

image

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).

-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)

Now we know what happened to the unicorns.

They were all EATEN.

WAIT ARE YOU TRYING TO TELL ME THEY’VE BEEN SELLING ME FAUXNICORN?????

image

fuckyeahmonsterenbies

So, aristosachaeon made a post about doing a nonbinary monster zine and asked for submissions. Here is what I wrote, I hope it doesn’t suck, enjoy!

issybird:

When you think of a monster
You think of the vampire, hiding in his castle
The minotaur, with his bulging muscles.
Gorgons, freezing all men to stone as it is said females tend to do,
Or mermaids, the sirens of the sea luring sailors down into the treacherous water.

You ignore the vampires who spend hundreds of years perfecting their androgyny.
You leave out the witches and wizards using magic to their advantage, to change their body to what makes them the most comfortable.
You push aside the merfolk, the elves, the phoenixs and harpies and countless other monsters of lore long forgotten finding and using pronouns in their own tongue, languages we shall never understand.

What we do understand is the pain.
Of not fitting in your own body.
Of not being accepted.
For every human going through pain and heartbreak and sorrow as they try to figure out what, if anything, is wrong with them
There is a monster out there that knows
Knows how you feel
Knows how to help

And in each one of us
Is a monster
Ready to pounce
Ready to strike at the slightest hint of danger
Ready to defend our siblings
Human and monster
With everything we have.

fuckyeahmonsterenbies

pandyart:

Probably the best assignment I’ve ever gotten: Monster Selfies. Literally draw your self as a monster taking a selfie. Yes??

I’m the kind of dork who has previously considered what kind of monster I’d be: A shaper shifter. I’ve got so many different looks + aesthetics I love. So here’s a myself as a Lasaryn showing my love of all that is dark and ‘scary’, A panda-oni that could very well be a fursona should i ever desire one showing my love of kawaii bullshit, and me as a swamp/plant monster to represent my connection to nature + the mori style. The #nofilter void-being would be the shapeshifter’s ‘natural form’.

Bonus Gif Form (warning it include camera flash as transitions) and a little more process work on the blogspot.